stompydragons

Review: Three Parts Dead by Max Gladstone

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Rating: 4/5 dead gods

A god has died, and it’s up to Tara, first-year associate in the international necromantic firm of Kelethres, Albrecht, and Ao, to bring Him back to life before His city falls apart.

Her client is Kos, recently deceased fire god of the city of Alt Coulumb. Without Him, the metropolis’s steam generators will shut down, its trains will cease running, and its four million citizens will riot.

Tara’s job: resurrect Kos before chaos sets in. Her only help: Abelard, a chain-smoking priest of the dead god, who’s having an understandable crisis of faith.

When Tara and Abelard discover that Kos was murdered, they have to make a case in Alt Coulumb’s courts—and their quest for the truth endangers their partnership, their lives, and Alt Coulumb’s slim hope of survival.

Review: I tried to read one of the books in this series–Two Serpents Rising, I think–a couple of years ago and bounced off it pretty hard. I don’t think this is a series that’s particularly readable out of order. Or at least, I don’t think it’s readable without having read this, the first one. Because instead of bouncing off it, I thoroughly enjoyed it. There were characters I really liked (Tara, Abelard), characters I thoroughly disliked, and a host of characters who are too complicated to put into simple like/dislike buckets.

The world-building is top-notch, but it’s also the reason I think this one needs to be read first no matter what order you pick after. Gladstone does a great job of explaining enough of a very strange world fast enough to keep the reader invested without providing obvious info-dumps, but he leaves enough unknown for the reader to want more at the end. There is a sense of a world that’s too vast for one story, with too much history behind it, but its history is also an important part of this story. Gladstone doesn’t try to explain all of it, though. He fills in the details of what we need, sketches in the rest, makes sure we understand the rules, and then trusts us to keep up.

The story in Three Parts Dead is given a satisfactory ending, but he doesn’t tie up everything in such a neat bow that it leaves the reader uncertain how an entire series can be maintained. If anything, he pulls off the neat trick of writing a satisfying story and leaving it open, which is a difficult thing to do.

The ending took me by surprise, but when I thought back, the clues were there all the way through. This is a mystery at heart, woven into a fantastical story that’s grounded in reality in a way I didn’t expect. I was torn between giving this a four or a five, because it’s really very, very good. But there were also one or two places where I thought Gladstone was a little too clever for his own good and he almost lost me, so I couldn’t call it perfect. He also claims it should be possible to pick this series up at any point, but I’d dispute that based on past experience.  I’ll definitely be going back to read the rest of the series, though, and I’ve been promised that it only gets better. Now that I’ve found my jumping on point (I learned my lesson about starting things mid-series, even if an author says it should be doable), I need to read more, which is the best sign I know of a good first book in a series.

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